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The RoBlog
Saturday, October 02, 2004
 
The DaVinci Institute - Interview with Gavalord
The DaVinci Institute has an interview with someone calling himself Gavalord. It's a good deal of crazy talk (communicating with the past - not that it definitely can't be done, but if it can, my guess is that it will be extremely hard to perform any successful experiments on it, much less the kinds of communication mentioned in this article), and fairy tales (I don't think this Gavalord person has done any of the things he says he's done), but it's interesting to see others thinking about the ability to reveal the past, like I have mentioned previously (note that this interview preceeds my thinking by a few years).

A couple things of note. First, the downside of using this technology could very well kill it outright. People are already protective of their privacy. They will not want the ability for someone to come along and discover everything they have said and done. This paranoia will kick in long before it is discovered that the weird, freaky, kinky things that people are interested in protecting are extremely common among human beings (something that will become common knowledge 20 or more years from know due to other events such as the pervasiveness of micro-survalliance technology).

The second note is that Gavalord indicates that, in the near future, the ability to coax out the last hour or so of a person's interactions from the walls, and other objects (such as clothes) around the person, will be the limit. I'm guessing that before this kind of technology is ever available even in proto-type, the fact that we are always recording eachother, coupled with advanced search capabilities developed for this recording, will mean that we have gotten to this point, effectively, in an entirely different, more straightforward way. This does not mean that the technology for peering into the past will not be developed due to lack of application, just that the particular application (law enforcement) mentioned by Gravalord is unlikely.

The DaVinci Institute - Interview with Gavalord
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